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Emile, or On Education Quotes

  • [Footnote: There is no one who looks down upon — Read more
  • [Footnote: The universal spirit of the laws of — Read more
  • [Footnote: The precept "Do unto others as you — Read more
  • Your ill-tempered child destroys everything he — Read more
  • Young teacher, pray consider this example, and — Read more
  • Young teacher, I am setting before you a — Read more
  • You must follow nature's guidance if you would — Read more
  • You do not think that Emile, at twenty, can — Read more
  • You assure me he learns several languages; I deny — Read more
  • You ask me if the movements of animals are — Read more
  • Yet, on the whole, I think the Greeks were very — Read more
  • Yet I admit that with such different teaching — Read more
  • Yet agriculture is the earliest, the most honest — Read more
  • Would you now judge him by comparison? Set him — Read more
  • Would you live in wisdom and happiness, fix your — Read more
  • Women have ready tongues; they talk earlier, more — Read more
  • Woman, weak as she is and limited in her range of — Read more
  • Woman has more wit, man more genius; woman — Read more
  • With the help of dice Descartes made heaven and — Read more
  • With regard to what will be called the systematic — Read more
  • Why then should we shut ourselves up within walls — Read more
  • Why are the Turks generally kinder and more — Read more
  • Who can deny that a vast number of things are — Read more
  • While our time is thus employed, we are ever on — Read more
  • While I lived on very friendly terms with him, I — Read more
  • Whether a virgin became the mother of her Creator — Read more
  • Where is the philosopher who would not deceive — Read more
  • When we review with the child the productions of — Read more
  • When the savage tastes wine for the first time — Read more
  • When Plato describes his imaginary good man — Read more
  • When man is content to be himself he is strong — Read more
  • When I thus get rid of children's lessons, I get — Read more
  • When I think that it is he that gives life and — Read more
  • When I see the studies of young men at the period — Read more
  • When he becomes capable of affection, he becomes — Read more
  • When Emile learns his trade I shall learn it too — Read more
  • When Augustus passed laws against celibacy, those — Read more
  • Whatever may be said by the scornful, good sense — Read more
  • What varied pleasures we enjoy in this delightful — Read more
  • What man has made, man may destroy. Nature's — Read more
  • What is there to kindle the hearts of lovers for — Read more
  • We wish to inspire the preference we feel; love — Read more
  • We lament the helplessness of infancy; we fail to — Read more
  • We have reached the moral order at last; we have — Read more
  • We cannot teach children the danger of telling — Read more
  • We can do nothing simply, not even for our — Read more
  • We are now in the world of morals, the door to — Read more
  • We are going to dine with wealthy people; when we — Read more
  • We are born, so to speak, twice over; born into — Read more
  • We are born sensitive and from our birth onwards — Read more
  • War only makes manifest events already determined — Read more
  • Une des preuves que le goût de la viande n’est pa — Read more
  • Tout est bien sortant des mains de l'Auteur des choses, tout dégénère entre les mains de l'homme.
  • Touched with compassion towards human weaknesses — Read more
  • To travel on foot is to travel in the fashion of — Read more
  • To remove these two obstacles at once, and to — Read more
  • To know what people may find pleasant or — Read more
  • To know how far a happy ignorance may prolong the — Read more
  • To guide him in this inquiry, after we have shown — Read more
  • To exist is to feel; our feeling is undoubtedly — Read more
  • Time was long during early childhood; we only — Read more
  • Thus when he does not find you continually — Read more
  • Thus the universe was peopled with gods like — Read more
  • Thus the different constitution of the two sexes — Read more
  • This study of different nations in their remoter — Read more
  • This results from the fact that, up to five or — Read more
  • This is one reason why I want to bring up Emile — Read more
  • This interval in which the strength of the — Read more
  • This habitual restraint produces a docility which — Read more
  • This collection of scattered thoughts and — Read more
  • This being who wills and can perform his will — Read more
  • THIRD MAXIM.—The pity we feel for others is p — Read more
  • Thinkers are seldom gamblers; gambling interrupts — Read more
  • They say French is more chaste than other — Read more
  • There is, moreover, a certain simplicity of taste — Read more
  • There is perhaps no civilised place upon earth — Read more
  • There is no one in the world less able to conceal — Read more
  • There is another point to be considered which — Read more
  • There is a third difficulty, more specious than — Read more
  • There is a stage of degradation which robs the — Read more
  • There are two kinds of dependence: dependence on — Read more
  • There are no colleges for girls; so much the — Read more
  • There are moments in human life which can never — Read more
  • There are countries, I grant you, where women — Read more
  • There are circumstances in which a man may be of — Read more
  • There are calm and gentle characters which can be — Read more
  • There are callings so great that they cannot be — Read more
  • Then approaching Emile she tapped him playfully — Read more
  • Their children have neither the tone nor the — Read more
  • The world is a palace fair enough for any one; — Read more
  • The weaker the body, the more imperious its — Read more
  • The way in which ideas are formed gives a — Read more
  • The value set by the general public on the — Read more
  • The true course of nature is slower and more — Read more
  • The toilet may attract notice, but it is the — Read more
  • The stream of memory is only interrupted by great — Read more
  • The sports of the young savage involve long — Read more
  • The splendour of nature lives in man's heart; to be seen, it must be felt.
  • The social relation of the sexes is a wonderful — Read more
  • The science of politics is and probably always — Read more
  • The savage, who has need of no one, and envies no — Read more
  • The rule of habit is only good for feeble hearts — Read more
  • the rich console themselves for the harm done by — Read more
  • The reply was simple. If it were only a question — Read more
  • The priest was so well known for his uprightness — Read more
  • The philosophic spirit has turned the thoughts of — Read more
  • The perception of our action upon other bodies — Read more
  • The people are mankind; those who do not belong — Read more
  • The other animals possess only such powers as are — Read more
  • The origin of our passions, the root and spring — Read more
  • The origin of our passions, the root and spring — Read more
  • The only moral lesson which is suited for a — Read more
  • The only example I know which might be quoted as — Read more
  • The one thing we do not know is the limit of the — Read more
  • The noblest virtues are negative, they are also — Read more
  • The new-born infant cries, his early days are — Read more
  • The most difficult fault to overcome in me was a — Read more
  • The misuse of books is the death of sound — Read more
  • The mind should be left undisturbed till its — Read more
  • The mere generation of living organic bodies is — Read more
  • The learned always despise the opinions of the — Read more
  • The great thing is to be kind to our neighbours — Read more
  • The great become small, the rich poor, the king a — Read more
  • The first sentiment of which the well-trained — Read more
  • The first causes of motion are not to be found in — Read more
  • The failing activity of the old man is centred in — Read more
  • The explosive passions produce a great effect — Read more
  • The circumstances with which we are concerned are — Read more
  • The child who is trying to speak should hear — Read more
  • The child is usually much quicker to read the — Read more
  • The chief risks occur at the beginning of life; — Read more
  • The chief harm which results from the monstrous — Read more
  • The chief drawback to this early education is — Read more
  • The charms of a peaceful family life must be — Read more
  • The careful reader will not suppose that all the — Read more
  • The cakes lead me to talk of the races Emile used — Read more
  • The abuse of books kills science. Believing that — Read more
  • That man is truly free who desires what he is — Read more
  • That fatal facility in the use of words we do not — Read more
  • Taste is formed partly by industry and partly by — Read more
  • Take from our hearts this love of what is noble — Read more
  • Suppose we are studying the course of the sun and — Read more
  • Supply the strength he lacks just so far as is — Read more
  • Supper was hurried forward on our account. When — Read more
  • sufficiently sensitive to understand every human — Read more
  • Still I cannot refrain from saying that men — Read more
  • Speaking generally Emile will have more taste for — Read more
  • Sophie is not beautiful, but in her company men — Read more
  • Something does us good, we seek after it; but we — Read more
  • Some one whose rank alone is known to me — Read more
  • So, decide to raise them [women] like men. The — Read more
  • So we do not travel like couriers but like — Read more
  • So long as chastity is preserved, it is respected; it is despised only after having been lost.
  • So do not train your pupil to look down from the — Read more
  • Silly children grow into ordinary men. I know no — Read more
  • Should he fall or bump his head, or make his nose — Read more
  • She has everything against her, our faults and — Read more
  • See how we are gradually approaching the moral — Read more
  • SECOND MAXIM.—We never pity another's woes unless we know we may suffer in like manner ourselves.
  • Remember that, as soon as selfishness has — Read more
  • Remember that to guide a grown man you must — Read more
  • Reason, friendship, affection, gratitude, a — Read more
  • Reading, solitude, idleness, a soft and sedentary — Read more
  • Puisqu’il nous faut absolument des livres, il e — Read more
  • Prudence! Prudence which is ever bidding us look — Read more
  • Present interest, that is the motive power, the only motive power that takes us far and safely.
  • Perseverance does instead of talent up to a — Read more
  • People make a great mystery of the ways of — Read more
  • People always play carelessly in games where — Read more
  • Passions of this kind, not having any germ in the — Read more
  • Parents choose a husband for their daughter and — Read more
  • Our passions are the chief means of — Read more
  • Our passions are the chief means of — Read more
  • Our natural passions are few in number; they are — Read more
  • Our island is this earth; and the most striking — Read more
  • Our inner conflicts are caused by these — Read more
  • Our appetite is only excessive because we try to — Read more
  • Où est l’homme de bien qui ne doit rien à son pay — Read more
  • One sex is attracted by the other; that is the — Read more
  • One must choose between making a man or a citizen, for one cannot make both at the same time.
  • One morning a few months later Emile enters my — Read more
  • Now that he is really eager to please, Emile — Read more
  • Not only do short-sighted mothers offer ornaments — Read more
  • Not long before the child had passed a small — Read more
  • Not every one can realise the motive power to be — Read more
  • No, if nature has given the child this plasticity — Read more
  • Never show a child what he cannot see. Since — Read more
  • Neither need you look for compliments from him; — Read more
  • Nature provides for the child's growth in her own — Read more
  • My son, there is no happiness without courage — Read more
  • My only set rule would be this: wherever I was I — Read more
  • Mothers and nurses grow fond of children because — Read more
  • Moreover, I maintain that the charm which these — Read more
  • Moreover, he knows by experience that there is — Read more
  • More than one reader will reproach me no doubt — Read more
  • Modesty only begins with the knowledge of evil; — Read more
  • Men, be kind to your fellow-men; this is your — Read more
  • Men say the golden age is a fable; it always will — Read more
  • Men say God owes nothing to his creatures. I — Read more
  • Men and women are made for each other, but their — Read more
  • May I venture at this point to state the greatest — Read more
  • Man's weakness makes him sociable. Our common — Read more
  • Man is the cheapest commodity on the market, and — Read more
  • Man is born to suffer; pain is the means of his — Read more
  • Looks must next be considered; they are the first — Read more
  • life is not breath, but action, the use of our — Read more
  • Let us lay it down as an incontrovertible rule — Read more
  • Let us keep Emile's hands from money lest he — Read more
  • Let us give him everything. Let us lavish charms — Read more
  • Let the room be furnished with plain and solid — Read more
  • Let him make his own map, a very simple map, at — Read more
  • let him learn to perform every exercise which — Read more
  • Leonidas died for his country before Socrates — Read more
  • Learning a trade matters less than overcoming the — Read more
  • Le plus heureux est celui qui souffre le moins de — Read more
  • La mort de Socrate, philosophant tranquillement — Read more
  • La gourmandise est le vice des cœurs qui n’ont po — Read more
  • Keep your children ever within the little circle — Read more
  • Keep this truth ever before you—Ignorance never d — Read more
  • Just as the least cultivated nations are usually — Read more
  • Jamais la nature ne nous trompe; c’est toujours nous qui nous trompons.
  • It would be sweet to lie generous towards one we — Read more
  • It would be better to have no idea at all of the — Read more
  • It must be admitted that this method has its — Read more
  • It matters little to me whether my pupil is — Read more
  • It is very strange that ever since people began — Read more
  • It is the great towns which exhaust the state and — Read more
  • It is ordinary people who have to be educated — Read more
  • It is one thing to follow a young man about for — Read more
  • It is one of the misfortunes of the rich to be — Read more
  • It is not, however, my intention that these — Read more
  • It is not easy for a man to begin to think; but — Read more
  • It is no part of a child's business to know right — Read more
  • It is maintained that unswaddled infants would — Read more
  • It is admitted that their flowing garments, which — Read more
  • Is there anything better worth seeing, anything — Read more
  • is a mistake to classify the passions as lawful — Read more
  • Ingratitude would be rarer if kindness were less — Read more
  • In the union of the sexes each alike contributes — Read more
  • In the following books I have still to speak of — Read more
  • In the fire of adolescence the life-giving — Read more
  • In ordinary social intercourse the manners — Read more
  • In everything you must show clearly the use — Read more
  • In every age, and especially in childhood, we — Read more
  • In a word, she endures patiently the wrong-doing — Read more
  • Il n’y a point de folie dont on ne puisse guérir un homme qui n’est pas fou, hors la vanité.
  • If you would guard against these abuses, and — Read more
  • If you wish to know what is meant by public — Read more
  • If you want to see a man in a quandary, place him — Read more
  • If woman is made to please and to be in — Read more
  • if while we speak to him of this great mystery of — Read more
  • If there is something he should not do, do not — Read more
  • If their childhood is made wretched by these — Read more
  • If the prince or the state calls you to the — Read more
  • If the laws of nations, like the laws of nature — Read more
  • If my scholar rarely gives me cause for such — Read more
  • If man in his turn ought to be pleasing in her — Read more
  • If love is suspicious, esteem is trustful; and — Read more
  • If in this world there is any condition so — Read more
  • If I were young, I would seek the pleasures of — Read more
  • If I have managed to take all the requisite — Read more
  • I would rather have him a shoemaker than a poet — Read more
  • I would prefer to begin the study of the human — Read more
  • I would have you so choose the company of a youth — Read more
  • I will go further and maintain that virtue is no — Read more
  • I was in that state of doubt and uncertainty — Read more
  • I suppose this prodigious diversity of opinion is — Read more
  • I should say to Emile, "This is a matter of — Read more
  • I should not be surprised if my pupil, who is a — Read more
  • I shall not take pains to prevent Emile hurting — Read more
  • I shall choose the time, place, and surroundings — Read more
  • I shall always maintain that whoso says in his — Read more
  • I proceed along the path which the force of — Read more
  • I observe that in modern times men only get a — Read more
  • I must not be surprised if that which is possible — Read more
  • I leave modern history on one side, not only — Read more
  • I have only one rule to give you which sums up — Read more
  • I hate books; they only teach us to talk about — Read more
  • I hate books; they only teach us to talk about things we know nothing about.
  • I had been brought up in a church which decides — Read more
  • I go to houses where the master and mistress do — Read more
  • I fear that these little saints who have been — Read more
  • I do not mean to say that he will never do any — Read more
  • I do not like verbal explanations. Young people — Read more
  • I consider those who would prevent the birth of — Read more
  • I cannot understand how any one can be a sceptic — Read more
  • I cannot repeat too often that I am not dealing — Read more
  • I cannot help picturing in the countenance of the — Read more
  • I am told that many midwives profess to improve — Read more
  • I am quite aware that Plato, in the Republic — Read more
  • I am aware that many of my readers will be — Read more
  • How swiftly life passes here below! The first — Read more
  • How narrow-minded to see nothing in the rising — Read more
  • How emphatically would I speak if it were not so — Read more
  • Hold childhood in reverence, and do not be in any — Read more
  • His face, his bearing, his expression, speak of — Read more
  • Herodotus records that the Lydians, [Footnote: — Read more
  • Her expression remains unchanged; but in spite of — Read more
  • Hence it follows that we are drawn towards our — Read more
  • He will not be feted as a charming man, but every — Read more
  • He will never set two dogs to fight, he will — Read more
  • He who knows enough of things to value them at — Read more
  • He who feels the need of help from others, he who — Read more
  • He thinks not of others but of himself, and — Read more
  • He must work like a peasant and think like a — Read more
  • He has no right to be a father if he cannot — Read more
  • he follows no rule, submits to no authority — Read more
  • Having reached this stage, and by this road, he — Read more
  • Having got so far as to be tolerated as an — Read more
  • Habit accustoms us to everything. What we see too — Read more
  • Greediness is a better motive than vanity; for — Read more
  • Great men are under no illusion with respect to — Read more
  • God makes all things good; man meddles with them — Read more
  • Go beyond this, and I see nothing but injustice — Read more
  • Give me a child of twelve who knows nothing at — Read more
  • From these considerations I arrive at the — Read more
  • Fresh air affects children's constitutions — Read more
  • For the sake of a show of preaching virtue you — Read more
  • For the reasons just stated, I consider that by — Read more
  • For myself, I am not pledged to the support of — Read more
  • For my own part I know no more terrible fate than — Read more
  • For his own part, should he need help, he will — Read more
  • FIRST MAXIM.—It is not in human nature to put o — Read more
  • FIRST MAXIM.—Far from being too strong, c — Read more
  • Extend self-love to others and it is transformed — Read more
  • Every substance in nature and every work of man — Read more
  • Every feeling of hardship is inseparable from the — Read more
  • Every age, every station in life, has a perfection, a ripeness, of its own.
  • Emile will not learn anything by heart, not even — Read more
  • Emile shall be as much at home in the water as on — Read more
  • Emile is no savage to be banished to the desert — Read more
  • Emile is a man of common sense and he has no — Read more
  • Emile does not want to write books; if ever he — Read more
  • Each of us, unable to dispense with the help of — Read more
  • do you desire to incline his disposition towards — Read more
  • Do not let us confuse the outward forms of — Read more
  • Dirons-nous que l’histoire de l’Évangile est inve — Read more
  • Desire mediocrity in all things, even in beauty — Read more
  • Cunning is a natural gift of woman, and so — Read more
  • Conscience is the voice of the soul; the passions are the voice of the body.
  • Commerce and the arts which blend and mingle the — Read more
  • By nature man thinks but seldom. He learns to — Read more
  • By nature a man bears pain bravely and dies in — Read more
  • But who am I? What right have I to decide? What — Read more
  • But whither am I going? O Emile! what art thou — Read more
  • But when, in my desire to discover my own place — Read more
  • But when we consider the fleeting nature of human — Read more
  • But when I think of a child of ten or twelve — Read more
  • But what is that life? Is the soul of man in its — Read more
  • But perhaps the number of things I have brought — Read more
  • But granting the usefulness of travel, does it — Read more
  • But for her sex, a woman is a man; she has the — Read more
  • But consider what a gulf there still is between — Read more
  • Boys and girls have many games in common, and — Read more
  • be sure your pupil, as he begins to understand — Read more
  • Be just, human, kindly. Do not give alms alone — Read more
  • Bayle has proved very satisfactorily that — Read more
  • At the name of Sophy you would have seen Emile — Read more
  • As the sentient being becomes active his — Read more
  • As the idolater gives what he loves best to the — Read more
  • As soon as a man needs a companion he is no — Read more
  • As for my pupil, or rather Nature's pupil, he has — Read more
  • And yet what dangerous prejudices are you — Read more
  • And this affection when developed has its — Read more
  • An exclusive education, which merely tends to — Read more
  • Ambition, avarice, tyranny, the mistaken — Read more
  • Although modesty is natural to man, it is not — Read more
  • All things considered, the trade I should choose — Read more
  • All children in the course of their endless — Read more
  • All capitals are just alike, they are a mixture — Read more
  • Again, monopoly destroys pleasure. Real pleasures — Read more
  • Affection and kind deeds rarely win hearts, and they hardly ever win them back.
  • Above all, beware of teaching the child empty — Read more
  • A young man, on the other hand, brought up in — Read more
  • A young man when he enters society must be — Read more
  • A savage will not turn his head to watch the — Read more
  • A Parisian thinks he has a knowledge of men and — Read more
  • A man says what he knows, a woman says what will — Read more
  • A foolish laugh may destroy six months' work and — Read more
  • "You ask me," said Plutarch, "why Pythagoras — Read more
  • "Why should we trouble ourselves about the empty — Read more
  • "What becomes of man when all we know of him — Read more
  • "Those among us who have the opportunity of — Read more
  • "The spectacle of the world," said Pythagoras — Read more
  • "Sta, viator; heroem calcas." If I had found this — Read more
  • "Since our young gentleman," says Locke, "is — Read more
  • "Reason with children" was Locke's chief maxim; — Read more
  • "My son will have to take the world as he finds — Read more
  • "In my exposition you find nothing but natural — Read more
  • "I am glad you feel this," said I, "but you need — Read more
  • "Husband and wife should choose each other. A — Read more
  • "Hard pressed by these arguments, some prefer to — Read more
  • "Dear Emile, I am glad indeed to hear you speak — Read more