QuotesBook.org

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding Quotes

  • Your reason... can never find any convincing — Read more
  • You tell me, indeed, that this disposition of — Read more
  • You seem not to remember, that all your — Read more
  • You find certain phenomena in nature. You seek a — Read more
  • Yet still reason must remain restless, and — Read more
  • Would we... form a just and precise idea of — Read more
  • Without the influence of custom, we should be — Read more
  • With what greediness are the miraculous accounts — Read more
  • Why torture your brain to justify the course of — Read more
  • Why has the will an influence over the tongue and — Read more
  • While we cannot give a satisfactory reason, why — Read more
  • While we argue from the course of nature, and — Read more
  • Wherein... consists the difference between fiction and belief?
  • Where we trace the principles of the human mind — Read more
  • When we say... that one object is connected to — Read more
  • When we reason a priori, and consider merely any — Read more
  • When we peruse the first histories of all nations — Read more
  • When we entertain... any suspicion that a — Read more
  • When we consider how aptly natural and moral — Read more
  • When we analyze our thoughts or ideas, however — Read more
  • When priests and poets... talk of a golden or — Read more
  • When men follow this blind and powerful instinct — Read more
  • When it is asked, What is the nature of all our — Read more
  • When anyone tells me, that he saw a dead man — Read more
  • When a child has felt the sensation of pain from — Read more
  • What never was seen or heard of, may yet be — Read more
  • What is the nature of that evidence which assures — Read more
  • What greater temptation than to appear a — Read more
  • Were any object presented to us, and were we — Read more
  • We must not... expect that this uniformity of — Read more
  • We must enquire how we arrive at the knowledge of — Read more
  • We must ...cultivate true metaphysics with some — Read more
  • We may... form another definition of cause, and — Read more
  • We may observe that the animal infers some fact — Read more
  • We may divide all the perceptions of the mind — Read more
  • We may discover the reason why no philosopher — Read more
  • We may define a cause to be an object, followed — Read more
  • We may consider the relation of cause and effect — Read more
  • We learn the influence of our will from — Read more
  • We have, in the following, attempted to throw — Read more
  • We have sought in vain for an idea of power or — Read more
  • We have no sentiment of consciousness of this — Read more
  • We always suppose an external universe, which — Read more
  • Ultimate springs and principles are totally shut — Read more
  • To reconcile the indifference and contingency of — Read more
  • To have recourse to the veracity of the Supreme — Read more
  • To convince us of this proposition, that where — Read more
  • To begin with clear and self-evident principles — Read more
  • Thought can in an instant transport us into the — Read more
  • Though virtue and honour be allowed their proper — Read more
  • Though our thought seems to posses... unbounded — Read more
  • Though none but a fool or a madman will ever — Read more
  • Though animals learn many parts of their — Read more
  • Though a philosopher may live remote from — Read more
  • Those who have a propensity to philosophy, will — Read more
  • This theory of the universal energy and operation — Read more
  • This principle is Custom or Habit, For wherever — Read more
  • These two propositions are far from being the — Read more
  • These teachers seem ever after, during the ages — Read more
  • These enlarged views [of Stoicism] may, for a — Read more
  • There is, in Dr. Tillotson's writings, an — Read more
  • There is nothing in a number of instances — Read more
  • There is not to be found, in all history, any — Read more
  • There is not a greater number of philosophical — Read more
  • There is no method of reasoning more common, and — Read more
  • There is a species of scepticism, antecedent to — Read more
  • There is a degree of doubt, and caution, and — Read more
  • There are other more profound arguments against the senses, which admit not of so easy a solution.
  • There are no ideas, which occur in metaphysics — Read more
  • There appears not, throughout all nature, any one — Read more
  • There appear to be only three principles of — Read more
  • The utmost effort of human reason is to reduce — Read more
  • The ultimate standard, by which we determine all — Read more
  • The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life — Read more
  • The smallest spark may here kindle into the — Read more
  • The sentiment of belief is nothing but a — Read more
  • The senses alone are not implicitly to be — Read more
  • The scenes of the universe are continuously — Read more
  • The same rule holds, whether the cause assigned — Read more
  • The same motives always produce the same actions; — Read more
  • The same experienced union has the same effect on — Read more
  • The relation of cause and effect... is either — Read more
  • The reason why we place any credit in witnesses — Read more
  • The pleasure of telling a piece of news so — Read more
  • The plain consequence is (and it is a general — Read more
  • The passion of surprise and wonder, arising from — Read more
  • The passion for philosophy, like that for — Read more
  • The only objects of the abstract science or of — Read more
  • The only object of hatred or vengeance is a — Read more
  • The only method of freeing learning... from these — Read more
  • The only immediate utility of all sciences, is to — Read more
  • The observation of human blindness and weakness — Read more
  • The mutual dependence of men is so great in all — Read more
  • The most perfect philosophy of the natural kind — Read more
  • The mind observes not always the same rule; but — Read more
  • The mind has never anything present to it but the — Read more
  • The mere philosopher is a character, which is — Read more
  • The many instances of forged miracles, and — Read more
  • The immediate object of power in voluntary motion — Read more
  • The imagination of man is naturally sublime — Read more
  • The imagination has the command over all its — Read more
  • The idea of God, as meaning an infinitely — Read more
  • The greater part of mankind are naturally apt to — Read more
  • The great source of our mistake in this subject — Read more
  • The general observations treasured up by a course — Read more
  • The finer sentiments of the mind, the operations — Read more
  • The experimental reasoning itself, which we — Read more
  • The experienced train of events is the great — Read more
  • The existence..., of any being can only be proved — Read more
  • The doctrines, both of necessity and of liberty — Read more
  • The difficulty, why we draw from a thousand — Read more
  • The Deity is known to us only by his productions — Read more
  • The contrary of every matter of fact is still — Read more
  • The Christian Religion not only was at first — Read more
  • The chief obstacle... to our improvement in the — Read more
  • The case is the same with moral as with physical — Read more
  • The case is different with the sciences [of — Read more
  • The best expedient to prevent confusion, is to be — Read more
  • The appearance of a cause always conveys the mind — Read more
  • The anatomist presents to the eye the most — Read more
  • The affections take a narrower and more natural — Read more
  • The advantages are so great, of starting an — Read more
  • The absurdity of these bold determinations of the — Read more
  • That the divinity may possibly be endowed with — Read more
  • Such is the influence of custom, that, where it — Read more
  • Solidity, extension, motion; these quantities are — Read more
  • Sight or feeling conveys an idea of the actual — Read more
  • Shall we esteem it worthy the labour of a — Read more
  • Resemblance, Contiguity and Causation... are the — Read more
  • Repentance wipes off every crime, if attended — Read more
  • Records of wars, intrigues, factions, and — Read more
  • Philosophers, observing that, almost in every — Read more
  • Our idea... of necessity and causation arises — Read more
  • One may safely say... that if we consider these — Read more
  • One considerable advantage, which results from — Read more
  • Of the first kind [Relations of Ideas] are the — Read more
  • Obscurity... is painful to the mind as well as to — Read more
  • Nothing, at first view, may seem more unbounded — Read more
  • Nothing is more free than the imagination of man; — Read more
  • Nothing can ever be present to the mind but an — Read more
  • Nothing can be more sceptical, or more full of — Read more
  • Nothing can be more convincing and satisfactory — Read more
  • Nor is geometry, when taken into the assistance — Read more
  • No testimony for any kind of miracle has ever — Read more
  • No priestly dogmas, invented on purpose to tame — Read more
  • No new fact can ever be inferred from the — Read more
  • Necessity may be defined in two ways, conformably — Read more
  • Nature will always maintain her rights, and — Read more
  • Nature must have provided some other principle — Read more
  • Nature is always too strong for principle. And — Read more
  • Morals and criticism are not so properly objects of the understanding as of taste and sentiment.
  • Men begin at the wrong end of this question — Read more
  • Men are less blamed for such actions as they — Read more
  • Many philosophers think themselves obliged by — Read more
  • Mankind are so much the same, in all times and — Read more
  • Man... must submit to business and occupation: — Read more
  • Lord Bacon seems to have embraced the same — Read more
  • Liberty... is also essential to morality, and — Read more
  • Liberty, when opposed to necessity, not to — Read more
  • Let your gods... O philosophers, be suited to the — Read more
  • Let any one define a cause, without comprehending — Read more
  • It seems almost impossible... to engage either in — Read more
  • It is universally allowed that nothing exists — Read more
  • It is universally acknowledged that there is a — Read more
  • It is only on the discovery of extraordinary — Read more
  • It is only experience, which teaches us the — Read more
  • It is not reasoning which engages us to suppose — Read more
  • It is impossible... that any arguments from — Read more
  • It is impossible for us to think of anything — Read more
  • It is easy for a profound philosopher to commit a — Read more
  • It is custom alone, which engages animals, from — Read more
  • It is constantly supposed that there is a — Read more
  • It is certain that the easy and obvious — Read more
  • It implies no contradiction that the course of — Read more
  • It forms a strong presumption against all — Read more
  • It becomes... no inconsiderable part of science — Read more
  • Irregular events... can be no proof that the laws — Read more
  • Indulge your passion for science, says she — Read more
  • In vain... should we proceed to determine any — Read more
  • In the infancy of new religions, the wise and — Read more
  • In proportion as men extend their dealings, and — Read more
  • In general, the characters of men are, to a — Read more
  • In all single instances of the operation of — Read more
  • Ignorance or impotence may be pleaded for so — Read more
  • If you affirm, that, while a divine providence is — Read more
  • If we... ask, What is the foundation of all — Read more
  • If we would explode any forgery in history, we — Read more
  • If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or — Read more
  • If we reason a priori, anything may appear able to produce anything.
  • If we be... engaged by arguments to put trust in — Read more
  • If these circumstances form, in reality, the — Read more
  • If there be any relation among objects which it — Read more
  • If the spirit of religion join itself to the love — Read more
  • If the cause, assigned for any effect, be not — Read more
  • If men attempt the discussion of questions which — Read more
  • If it happen, from a defect of an organ, that a — Read more
  • If I ask you why you believe any particular — Read more
  • If by consciousness we perceived any power or — Read more
  • I say, that, even after we experience of the — Read more
  • I much doubt whether it be possible for a cause — Read more
  • I have frequently considered, what could possibly — Read more
  • I acknowledge, that, in the present order of — Read more
  • Humes's most elaborate philosophical work was his — Read more
  • Here is the chief and most confounding objection — Read more
  • Here is a chain of natural causes and voluntary — Read more
  • He [the Pyrrhonian] must acknowledge... that all — Read more
  • Having found, in many instances, that any two — Read more
  • From this circumstance alone, that a controversy — Read more
  • From the observation of several parallel — Read more
  • From causes which appear similar, we expect — Read more
  • Free audiobook of An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, from LibriVox.
  • First... if human actions can be traced up, by a — Read more
  • Every part of mixed mathematics proceeds upon the — Read more
  • Every miracle..., pretended to have been wrought — Read more
  • Every idea that we examine is copied from a — Read more
  • Every idea is copied from some preceding — Read more
  • Every effect is a distinct event from its cause — Read more
  • Eloquence, when at its highest pitch, leaves — Read more
  • Do we pretend to be acquainted with the nature of — Read more
  • Divinity or Theology, as it proves the existence — Read more
  • Custom... is the great guide of human life. It is — Read more
  • Could... dogmatical reasoners become sensible of — Read more
  • Complex ideas, may, perhaps, be well known by — Read more
  • By what invention can we throw light upon these — Read more
  • By opposing so many vices and follies, it — Read more
  • By liberty... we can only mean a power of acting — Read more
  • But what must a philosopher think of those vain — Read more
  • Beyond the constant conjunction of similar — Read more
  • Besides that the ordinary course of nature may — Read more
  • Bereave matter of all its intelligible qualities — Read more
  • Belief is nothing but a more vivid, lively — Read more
  • Being once convinced that we know nothing farther — Read more
  • Beauty, whether moral or natural, is felt, more — Read more
  • As there is no matter of fact which we believe so — Read more
  • As the violations of truth are more common in the — Read more
  • As the faculties of the mind are supposed to be — Read more
  • As nature has taught us the use of our limbs — Read more
  • As long as we rashly suppose, that we have some — Read more
  • Are... remote and uncertain speculations able to — Read more
  • Are there any marks of a distributive justice in — Read more
  • Any theory, by which we explain the operations of — Read more
  • Animals, therefore, are not guided in these — Read more
  • An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding @University of Adelaide
  • An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding @Google Books
  • Among [all] different languages even where we — Read more
  • Allowing..., the gods to be the authors of the — Read more
  • All the philosophy... in the world, and all the — Read more
  • All the materials of thinking are derived either — Read more
  • All the colours of poetry, however splendid, can — Read more
  • All sensations, either outward or inward, are — Read more
  • All reasonings may be divided into two kinds — Read more
  • All reasonings concerning matter of fact seem to — Read more
  • All proceeds from the usual propensity of mankind — Read more
  • All probability... supposes an opposition of — Read more
  • All polite letters are nothing but pictures of — Read more
  • All our ideas are nothing but copies of our impressions.
  • All our faculties can never carry us farther in — Read more
  • All other enquiries of men [aside from quantity — Read more
  • All objects of human reason or enquiry may — Read more
  • All mankind has ever agreed in the doctrine of — Read more
  • All inferences from experience... are effects of custom, not of reasoning.
  • All ideas, especially abstract ones, are — Read more
  • All effects follow not with like certainty from — Read more
  • All belief of matter of fact or real existence is — Read more
  • All arguments from experience are founded on the — Read more
  • All arguments concerning existence are founded on — Read more
  • After the constant conjunction of two — Read more
  • Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to — Read more
  • According to these philosophers, every thing is — Read more
  • According to the principle... which denies — Read more
  • A wise man... proportions his belief to the — Read more
  • A story, which is universally exploded in the — Read more
  • A religionist may be an enthusiast, and imagine — Read more
  • A philosopher, who purposes only to represent the — Read more
  • A miracle is a violation of the laws of nature; — Read more
  • A correct Judgement observes a contrary method — Read more